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Published on Oct 08, 2021
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Sophia Clark

Is Free Fire Safe for Kids? App Safety Guide for Parents

Are you concerned that your child spends a lot of time playing online games? Every child enjoys playing games, and in this technological age, online games are thriving but has many risks that you should know.

As a parent, you should know that you're not alone in your concerns about your child's safety while playing an online multiplayer game. Most parents get concerned about the multiplayer structure and open communication policy, and many are unsure if it is safe for their children.

Free Fire shares many of the same issues as most online games. The potential source of worry in the game is open chat as well as "team" chat. In the open chat function, children can chat with anyone playing the game. An in-game voice chat function allows communication with teammates (any random player if team slots are empty).

According to a new Canadian study published in Molecular Psychiatry, human-computers can harm the brain when turned on interactions, such as playing video games. Scientists have told us that action video game players exhibit better visual attention, motor control abilities, and short-term memory for over ten years.

Parents should alter their child's device settings or install third-party phone monitoring apps. It will prevent your children from installing or registering any game without your knowledge.

What is Garena Free Fire?

Free Fire, also known as Garena Free Fire, is an online multiplayer game with a third-person perspective. It allows up to fifty people to compete for Top position. It is a free-to-play shooting game developed by Garena, the gaming section of the internet corporation Sea, based in Singapore. In the game, players dive into an island, grab weapons and power-ups, and end one another.

The game is a battle royale, which combines survival, exploration, and survival in an online multiplayer video game. In Free Fire, survival requires you to be the "last man standing" among 49 other players after 10 minutes of gameplay. You can do this by staying in the safe zone and killing by shooting other humans.

While there isn't much blood, there is graphic violence, such as a shattered skull on a crimson spot when you kill another player. You can see injured people crawling away from combat, clutching their stomachs, and firearms usage in the game.

Why Do Kids Like To Play Free Fire?

Free Fire requires players to be older than similar games, but that won't stop your children from playing it. After knowing and looking at the reviews of the game, it will pique a child's interest in playing an interesting game.

Children play this game because of the following reasons:

Free and Fast-paced

It is free and has fast-paced matches which end in about 10minutes, and players can play together with their friends.

Simple And Easy To Play

Free Fire game is one of the simple Battle Royale games; the features offered will assist players in assaulting their enemies.

There's a feature called Auto Aim in the Free Fire. With this feature, when turned on, it will be easier for players to assault the opponent. As a result, this game is the best option and is frequently picked by children nowadays.

Most Popular Game(Play store)

When youngsters wish to download games, they are usually more interested in playing the recommended games. One of them is currently the game Free Fire, which has always been a recommendation for the Playstore.

So, if a lot of kids play the Free Fire game, this is natural. Even if it's merely a suggestion at first, it piques their attention, making children start playing the Free Fire game.

Enjoyable Game

Battle Royale is a thrilling game, particularly in its Free Fire mode. It is also known that the gameplay in the Free Fire game is both entertaining and cool. That is why today's kids still enjoy the Free Fire game. The game's features are still growing and becoming more intriguing, especially up to this point.

Low-requirements on device

Compatible with low-end smartphones, unlike other games which have high requirements.

Parents can try playing it to gain a taste of it and its culture before deciding if they want their kids exposed to such games. If not, blocking the game using parental control software is usually a good idea, at least until youngsters get older.

Is Free FireFire safe for kids?

What makes you think Freefire is dangerous? Will it cause a real-life murder or a real-life bloodbath? If that's the case, it's not so dangerous. It's harmful in a way that it damages your children's eyes, gives them hands or finger cramps, and affects their studies or mental health if played without restriction. Children would experience these symptoms if they played the game for too long. But the game won't be so harmful if you make them keep the least playtime to 2 hours every day.

Garena Free Fire is also a mixture of both violence and a funny sense of humor. Profanities are flying as fast as gunshots, and there is an attempt to control weapon violence with more weapons. Its dialogues and widespread gun use may also be offensive to some adult viewers.

Some reasons why Free Fire is not safe for children:

Violent content

The violence in Free Fire is not so gory, but the players moan in pain before collapsing and dying, and there is blood on the spot. Here, Killing is casual, and the blood and injury results get presented in the graphic.

  • Violent depictions that are brief and explicit.
  • There are a lot of weapons, and hand-to-hand action, with a lot of blood and detail.
  • Violent activities with blood and tissue damage get depicted in real-time.
  • Representations of physical assault, injuries, and surgery are common.
  • There are a few disturbing images here and there.

Behavior Change

The game can make your youngster hostile, and if he loses a match while playing it, they will begin behaving badly. They will start saying things like "I don't get any freedom" and other things they didn't say before if you try to stop them from playing.

Toxic players and bullying

Your kids will meet some toxic players in the game who keep on using foul language. If kids playing the game have low-level skills, then profanities and cursing come flying their way. As parents, you must keep in mind that your kids have the chance to converse with strangers who may use inappropriate language. The strangers can be sexual predators or may try to steal personal information.

It is an ongoing issue; children may talk with much older gamers, unaware that they are playing with a child still in elementary school. There are many instances of coarse language, which included:

  • Widespread usage of the sexual expletive and variations, sometimes in a sexual context.
  • Use of slang, cursing, profanity, and filthy terms.
  • Insults based on sexuality and development.

Gaming addiction

You can become less productive if you play too many online games. Video game addiction is not a new phenomenon, but it is important to understand that it is harmful.

Socially inactive

Because most gamers spend their entire day playing online games, they are socially inactive.

Poor physical and mental health

One's tendency is to become sedentary. It is not healthy for your physical health to sit in one location and play for long periods. Additionally, gazing at a computer screen for long periods might harm your eyesight and cause headaches. Due to a lack of social connection, those hooked to playing online games might become agitated or anxious in public.

Disrupts sleep pattern

You should be aware that spending too much time in front of a computer screen might make it difficult to fall asleep, even if you decide to call it a day.

Pay-To-Win game

Parents aren't aware of it, but it is a pay-to-win game. Many fantastic gun skins are available in the game, each of which has its own set of abilities. The gun skins are appealing and have some abilities, which can lead to the extreme money spending. For example, if your child uses a default skin and plays against a person who purchases the in-game most of the time, your child may eventually ask you to give them money.

How can parents make the Free FireFire safe for children?

Free Fire is working to ensure that all players have a pleasant, safe, and enjoyable experience. Players under the age of majority (child/children) must get parental permission before playing the game.

The Free Fire app has no inbuilt parental restrictions; besides the violence, there is significant pressure to buy inside the game. It also relates to the law on age restrictions, and it only protects children to the bare minimum.

Greater communication is one way that could help in Gaming addiction; like any other addiction, it is a severe problem. Instead of ignoring and punishing, parents and children must come together and talk about these issues.

Some Safety tips for parents:

Children under 13 years are technically prohibited from signing up for Free Fire without their parents' permission. It's a restriction that lasts until they reach the age of majority in their jurisdiction.

As a parent, you can cancel an account and switch off the game by contacting the game company if you don't want your children to play this game. It also monitors its social media accounts for support requests and complaints, and there are in-app mechanisms for reporting unethical activity.

Parental controls

Understanding parental control settings should always be your first step when your child wants to explore a new game, platform, app, or website. At the same time, you should sit down and play the game with your child to better grasp it and be better equipped to assist them in navigating it.

It's also critical for parents to realize that no parental control system is flawless. There is always some element of risk on a site with millions of users.

In-game talk or chat permission

Parents should teach their children not to communicate with strangers (unless they're a friend or someone they know in real life) and not accept private messages from strangers. It's also recommended that youngsters should never send out personal information. Tell your kids to follow their instincts if someone makes them feel uncomfortable, and never shift a chat to another platform.

Purchase Restriction

Free FireFire is a pay-to-win game, and you should never allow your child to play this game if you can't restrict their buying. It's like casino games morphing into a battle royale as compared to a lot of battle royales. As a parent, you should limit or restrict their in-game buying and recommend other games which are not pay to win.

No closed door gaming

Children should not play games behind closed bedroom doors but rather in an open, family space where parents may supervise them. The pressures on parents will only intensify as children gain access to more advanced technologies.

Not Allowed To Make Changes

Parents can also create a PIN to prevent their children from making changes to their accounts without your consent, such as granting them more playtime. It also gives parents the option of curating their gaming lists for their kids.

Open Communication Line

Whether you're supervising your child or not, have a direct and open conversation to ensure that your child understands. If they see or feel something online that doesn't seem right, they can and should tell you.

Maintaining connection through these regular talks will help you spot any possible issues. Also, checking in occasionally to see how they're using the platform can help keep your kids safe.

No Criticism

The game is very violent, but you should never criticize your children or the game for playing it. Criticism is not the solution as it can lead children to develop poor self-perception that can affect them for their entire lives. Low self-esteem, hopelessness about one's ability to succeed, and reliance on external validation are all outcomes of parental criticism.

Conclusion

Parents should spend time with their children, but you shouldn't try to lecture them about their addiction while you're with them. If you're annoyed by your child's behavior, show them something else to distract them from the game. Watch some movies together, or give them some books to read, or share some old recollections.

You should spend time with family and try to shift your kid's attention to something else and assist them in discovering their interests. If you don't want Your kids to play free Fire, show them something else. Most kids don't want to play other games once they've found something they enjoy.

Frequently Asked Questions

Who can talk to my children on Free Fire?

Free Fire players can talk with other players they've added to their friend list as well as chat while playing the game. The chat function in Free Fire intends to encourage player interaction and promote a strong sense of community. Players can communicate with team members when they add others to their friend list.

What can I do if my child comes in contact with inappropriate communication on Free Fire?

Encourage your children to use the game's in-app reporting features to report any inappropriate activity. It's also possible to report through social networks or provide details to the game's Support Page.

The game investigates all such reports and takes appropriate action, up to and including banning players from the game. Any accounts discovered to be unlawful, fraudulent, harassing, defamatory, or threatening will get reported to law enforcement.

Children are spending real money on online games. Is it worth it? Spending real money allows users to get extra items and different skins inside the game, leading to more enjoyment. The fundamental goal of playing the games is for players to have fun; if investing real money achieves this, it is worthwhile.

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Sophia Clark

Sophia Clark is a writer from Sydney, kid-lit enthusiast, and mom of three kids who loves to writes about motherhood, parenting, and big feelings.